Occasionally in my free time I art, and thus far I've only had one blog that's been focused solely on my writing. So here's a place to come and see my various artistic endeavors. And other silly things that inspire me.

And probably lots of cats...
Everything on this blog unless otherwise stated belongs to me and may NOT be used or altered in any way.

 

Bring Back G-Sleeve

overbygr:

I can’t express how touched I was to read the outpouring of comments after I posted this originally. Professor Gildersleeve means so much to so many students. Now, we are working on turning these feelings into action.

If you feel Gildersleeve should still be teaching at SCAD, please join our facebook group dedicated to seeing this through. We are going to convince SCAD of its error and bring back this amazing professor. By reaching out and voicing their dissent to the school administration, other students have succeeded with such efforts when SCAD fired other beloved faculty in the past. I know that we,  present and former students of the Sequential Art program, can do the same. If you agree, please join our group at http://www.facebook.com/groups/833806693296037/ or search “Bring Back G-Sleeve.”

I personally contacted Professor Gildersleeve to ask if he would allow us to argue his case. We have his sanction. I think this is completely winnable. Gildersleeve has been a fixture of the department for most of its history. Generations of sequential artists have benefited from his wisdom. As I said, most of the present professors were at one point his students. Whatever reason SCAD had for firing him, is lunacy in the face of this fact.

We plan to send petitions to the chairs of Sequential Art and the Communication Arts department, as well as to the Ombudsman. I believe that if even a percentage of the alumni and present students whose art has been transformed by Gildersleeve’s teaching sign this petition, SCAD will have no choice but to reverse its decision. 

If you’d like to see this come to pass, join the facebook group and give it a signal boost by reblogging or by posting the link yourself.

Thank you so much.

Graham

overbygr:

I don’t normally use this blog to for personal posts or text posts (and I feel bad for not posting artwork lately, but I’m still between scanners). Today I must make an exception for a text post. If you attended or are attending SCAD I encourage you to read it.

I recently heard that Dave Gildersleeve is not going to be teaching at SCAD anymore. I don’t know exactly what happened, but if you know SCAD you know it has a tendency to fire professors for inscrutable reasons. A lot of professors I respected greatly left SCAD during my time as a student, voluntarily or otherwise. However, I always thought Gildersleeve was beyond this. Apparently I was mistaken. I can’t really express what terrible news this is.

G-sleeve taught me literally everything I know about color and painting. Over three years of taking his classes whenever I could, he imparted a wealth of knowledge about color, storytelling, pacing, page flow, lighting, composition, perspective, anatomy,  and so, so much more. You would be hard pressed to find any graduate of SCAD’s sequential art program who doesn’t owe an enormous debt of gratitude to this man. Most the department’s present faculty took classes with him when they were students.

His classes were always laid back and casual. His conversational style of teaching is exemplified in his TED Talk, linked above.

But you could count on him, in individual meetings and formal critiques, to give it to you straight every time. Gildersleeve could look at your thirty-second thumbnail gesture and tell you the crop was too wide or too close. He could look at the work of a novice or of a seasoned professional, and give honest, practical, and sage advice to them both. Getting assignments back in his classes, I and my fellow students would eagerly scan the tracing paper overlays on which he scrawled notes about our work. Often, he used the overlays to redraw poses or compositions underneath, and we were always dazzled by how few lines he could use to show a better alternative to whatever drawing we had submitted.

I have yet to fully comprehend, process, and utilize the lessons I learned in Gildersleeve’s classes. I imagine this will take me years. I’m glad I took notes.

It deeply saddens me to think that future students won’t benefit from Gildersleeve’s wisdom. If SCAD can’t find it in its cold, corporate heart to let him teach there anymore, the class of 2016 will be the last one to take classes with him. I really can’t think of a worse sleight against future generations of aspiring cartoonists than this.

If you took classes with this great teacher, this great guy, I encourage you to reblog this with your memories or comments, or write your own post about him. I don’t want this to pass silently like so many other decisions SCAD has made. I know I will be haunted by this dark turn of events for a long time to come.

Graham

Cars & dinosaurs: David Gildersleeve at TEDxEmbryRiddle

overbygr:

I don’t normally use this blog to for personal posts or text posts (and I feel bad for not posting artwork lately, but I’m still between scanners). Today I must make an exception for a text post. If you attended or are attending SCAD I encourage you to read it.

I recently heard that Dave Gildersleeve is not going to be teaching at SCAD anymore. I don’t know exactly what happened, but if you know SCAD you know it has a tendency to fire professors for inscrutable reasons. A lot of professors I respected greatly left SCAD during my time as a student, voluntarily or otherwise. However, I always thought Gildersleeve was beyond this. Apparently I was mistaken. I can’t really express what terrible news this is.

G-sleeve taught me literally everything I know about color and painting. Over three years of taking his classes whenever I could, he imparted a wealth of knowledge about color, storytelling, pacing, page flow, lighting, composition, perspective, anatomy,  and so, so much more. You would be hard pressed to find any graduate of SCAD’s sequential art program who doesn’t owe an enormous debt of gratitude to this man. Most the department’s present faculty took classes with him when they were students.

His classes were always laid back and casual. His conversational style of teaching is exemplified in his TED Talk, linked above.

But you could count on him, in individual meetings and formal critiques, to give it to you straight every time. Gildersleeve could look at your thirty-second thumbnail gesture and tell you the crop was too wide or too close. He could look at the work of a novice or of a seasoned professional, and give honest, practical, and sage advice to them both. Getting assignments back in his classes, I and my fellow students would eagerly scan the tracing paper overlays on which he scrawled notes about our work. Often, he used the overlays to redraw poses or compositions underneath, and we were always dazzled by how few lines he could use to show a better alternative to whatever drawing we had submitted.

I have yet to fully comprehend, process, and utilize the lessons I learned in Gildersleeve’s classes. I imagine this will take me years. I’m glad I took notes.

It deeply saddens me to think that future students won’t benefit from Gildersleeve’s wisdom. If SCAD can’t find it in its cold, corporate heart to let him teach there anymore, the class of 2016 will be the last one to take classes with him. I really can’t think of a worse sleight against future generations of aspiring cartoonists than this.

If you took classes with this great teacher, this great guy, I encourage you to reblog this with your memories or comments, or write your own post about him. I don’t want this to pass silently like so many other decisions SCAD has made. I know I will be haunted by this dark turn of events for a long time to come.

Graham

Mermaid Update #2

I THINK we’re actually sore from sculpting for 4.5 hours straight on Sunday, how sad is that? XD My legs hurt lol

Also ordered the plaster yesterday. 50 pounds of it. We are prepared to make molds of Godzilla. (Except not actually, this shit gets hot).

And has $80 shipping, apparently. So that’s pretty cool. -_- Didn’t realize that until after I ordered. Always carefully check your orders, kids.

Updated Fluke design. I just shaved a bit off the edges because I felt like it was too round and bubbly and I wanted it to be more sporty.

Nyoom mermaid!

But really. I transferred my original template- which was on cheap flimsy paper - to more solid poster board so that we could lay it on top of the clay and cut out the general silhouette more easily.

The second image shows my monofin on top of the template to give an idea how the fin will fit inside the fluke. Once we make the mold, we’ll pull two latex positives from it, and then sandwich the monofin between the layers, gluing them with latex and possibly some plumbers goop. It’s really important that the sculpt be as symmetrical as humanly possible because we aren’t making a second mold for the flip-side, we’re just pulling two and then flipping one over.

We should start the sculpting process this weekend, so excited!!

Our clay arrived today!! It was a day earlier than we anticipated! So now we’re prepping the templates for our flukes. 

I ran out of paper so this might not be as wide as I want the fluke to be - I’m not sure how I feel about the length compared to the width. It seems a little fat in the middle XD 

Still working on it. The design will be folded in half and traced so that both sides will be even

Our clay arrived today!! It was a day earlier than we anticipated! So now we’re prepping the templates for our flukes.

I ran out of paper so this might not be as wide as I want the fluke to be - I’m not sure how I feel about the length compared to the width. It seems a little fat in the middle XD

Still working on it. The design will be folded in half and traced so that both sides will be even

Mermaid Update #1: Clay!

Ordered the clay to sculpt our flukes! Should be arriving between Thursday and next Tuesday, most excited.

We found 25 pounds of wet, air drying clay on Amazing for $17.99 plus $4.99 shipping, which was still WAY cheaper than what we were looking at from places like Blick. Blick had 2 pound tubs for almost $11.

Do your research, kids. Check everywhere and you can find a super cheap option.

I’ll upload our materials list soon so you guys can see the general cost if everything we’re looking to buy in case you’re interested :) I’ll also list the sources from which we’re acquiring all this stuff.

Happy swimming!

Doodlin’ some fancy fish butts :P

My sister and I wanted to do some sort of “Sea dragon” based designs, after our mom suggestion dragon tails when she saw HTTYD2.

Doodlin’ some fancy fish butts :P

My sister and I wanted to do some sort of “Sea dragon” based designs, after our mom suggestion dragon tails when she saw HTTYD2.